San Antonio Spurs: Lonnie Walker IV is paving the way for a legacy the River City

MIAMI, FLORIDA - OCTOBER 08: Lonnie Walker IV #1 of the San Antonio Spurs looks on before the preseason game against the Miami Heat at American Airlines Arena (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - OCTOBER 08: Lonnie Walker IV #1 of the San Antonio Spurs looks on before the preseason game against the Miami Heat at American Airlines Arena (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)
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In the wake of the nation-wide protests as a response to police brutality, San Antonio Spurs wing Lonnie Walke stepped up for his new home, the River City.

It’s unavoidable: People are sick and tired of watching unarmed black men and women murdered at the hands of police. Most recently, the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis sparked protests and riots throughout the country that triggered similar responses in the home of the San Antonio Spurs. Second-year wing Lonnie Walker IV contributed to the festivities, but not in the way you might think.

After San Antonians protested, and in some instances, damaged property, Lonnie took to the streets of the Alamo City to clean up in the morning after the events. Walker roamed the city with friends and colleagues, covering up graffiti and handing out supplies to people on all sides of the issue: Protestors, small-business owners and even some police officers along the way.

Walker’s approach to contributing doesn’t diminish his intent. Just because he didn’t participate in the main event or lead a protest himself, like Boston Celtics wing Jaylen Brown did in Atlanta, doesn’t mean that he didn’t do the extraordinary by going out and showing the community that he cares. Walker did justice to Floyd by doing the one job that protestors and rioters don’t take responsibility for: Cleaning up the aftermath.

Hope y’all feel me ??? pic.twitter.com/O2kgVlpY1J

— Lonnie Walker IV (@lonniewalker_4) May 31, 2020

More life ?? love y’all….. pic.twitter.com/9e7e3n8ubO

— Lonnie Walker IV (@lonniewalker_4) May 31, 2020

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Is that the priority in all of this? Certainly not, but someone has to do it and Walker saw this as a chance to connect with the community that’s embraced him since he was drafted 18th overall in the 2018 NBA Draft.

It almost feels trivial to talk about this all from a basketball perspective and quite honestly, I feel weird doing it, but it’s my responsibility to talk about it from that point of view. What we saw through Walker’s actions is that he has the nobility and heart of a true Spur. More so than just putting championships in a trophy case and hanging banners, the Spurs organization has spent decades building a culture that prioritizes people over a game.

For Walker to go out and show his love to San Antonio today proves that he belongs with this team. Fans are going to look back and remember that in times when it’s so easy to get caught up in hatred, negativity and doubt, Walker provided a glimmer of light while going out and spreading the same message as the protestors themselves: It’s time to make a change.

Next. Does Lonnie Walker deserve to start for the Spurs?

To be a good Spur, you usually have to be a good person and Walker is certainly that.

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